New Artist: Jaiye Farrell by Caleb Savage

We’re pleased to share with you work from our new artist: Jaiye Farrell!

We loved Christie Owen’s work on our walls and will miss pieces like Jupiter, but we’re also thrilled share new work with you!

About Jaiye’s work

“Oklahoma-based artist Jaiye Farrell cultivated his style of painting from abstract patterns that transcend societal and cultural divides and remember the communal roots of humanity. From an infatuation with archeology emerged a creative and ambitious talent: to craft signature designs that inspire self-reflection.”

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Staff Picks

Each time a new artist brings their work to the shop, the atmosphere changes just a little. It sometimes takes regulars a moment to catch the change, but when they do, people stay a little longer, consider the pieces, and share with us their interests in art or how they feel about the current work.

Jaiye’s work blends into our cafe, but when a piece catches someone’s eye, it seems to draw them in and examine the smaller details in the painting. Joel’s a fan of Molocale Materia. “I like the piece because it has perspective. It makes me stop, and think a little more introspectively.”


Next time you’re in the shop, take a minute and let us know what your favorite piece is!

Coffee Questions: What is Terrior by Caleb Savage

Every so often, we get a question at the bar related to coffee or our thoughts on coffee that we feel should be discussed on a larger platform. We started a series of posts called Coffee Questions where we try to answer those questions and leave as a resource to anyone looking to learn more about the industry, brewing, or anything else! Click here to check out other posts in this series!

For our October Palate Training, we tried some Dick Taylor Chocolates from Madagascar, Belize, and Brazil and discussed the role different environmental effects have on the outcome of coffee, chocolate, and most other plant products! Factors like what variety of plant is being used, where the coffee is grown, sunlight and water received, and other decisions being made by farmers can all make a significant impact on the quality of the your morning cup of coffee. We can wrap all of those ideas into a single idea: terroir.

Terroir. /terˈwär./ Tear-wah. Yes, we’re bringing French to the blog. Pardon.

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Are Red Delicious Apples even Moderately Delicious?

I don’t think so. I’m more of a Granny Smith fan. Gala is okay, but save the Red Delicious for applesauce. I don’t want it. What’s with the apple rant? Gala, Granny Smith, and Red Delicious are all varieties of apples. We can categorize them under that broad category of “apple” and you recognize them as they are, but no one would say that a Granny Smith apple tasted the same as a Red Delicious apple. Like apples, coffea arabica, the species of plant we use to make coffee has dozens of varieties grown around the world.

How does variety affect coffee?

Thanks to World Coffee Research, we can learn more about the different Arabica varieties, their susceptibility to various diseases, and other information farmers making decisions about profitability would be concerned with.

The variety of coffee plant grown can have a significant factor in the outcome and profitability of coffee, but it’s not the only factor.

Elevated Sweetness

In general, the higher elevation a coffee is grown, the better we will be able to achieve more sweetness & better developed flavors in the cup. Why?

Because temperatures are lower at higher elevations, coffee cherries mature more slowly which allows for more and more complex sugars to develop in the fruit. These sugars get stored in the seed that ends up becoming what we know as roasted coffee beans and when brewed, result in sweetness in your espresso or coffee!

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For coffees grown at lower elevations, farming decisions like shade and controlling access to water can mimic the benefits of higher elevation.

Care Creates Quality

At the end of the day, terroir is the set of environmental factors that affect the quality of our end cup of coffee, and more importantly, the sustainability of our industry, and the profitability of coffee producers.

For most coffee farmers and producers, developing coffees to their fullest potential is about increasing profitability and providing for their families and employees. This dedication to quality leads to higher premiums for their coffees and recognition from the coffee community. Therefore, a producer armed with the right tools, knowledge, and experience can temper potentially negative environmental concerns to cultivate excellent coffee.

We love getting to share great coffees with you every day. These coffees come from roasters, importers, producers, and farmworkers working hard to ensure that only the best is harvested, sorted, roasted, and brewed for you. If you’re curious about learning more about the coffees we serve, just ask a barista next time you’re in the shop!

Chocolate Palate Training: Class Recap by Caleb Savage

Last weekend we hosted a chocolate palate training and discussed how environmental factors impact the taste and quality of coffee!

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Using our Dick Taylor chocolate bars, we tried chocolates from Belize, Brazil, Madagascar, and a 58% milk chocolate bar using the same chocolate from Madagascar! Like coffee, the taste of chocolate can vary based on where the plant is grown, how the cacao or coffee bean is harvested and cared for, and how the product is roasted and prepared to be served.

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Afterwards, we compared the chocolates to KLLR Coffee’s Guatemala Ranferi Morales, a coffee from Southwestern Guatemala with a sweet milk chocolate body and tart grape acidity.

Curious about coffee growing and processing? Check out our overview on coffee from seed to cup!

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October Drink Specials by Caleb Savage

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This Fall weather had us so excited for the next few months we launched our #PSL on the first day of Fall! We wrote about the Spice Islands and their impact in our favorite Fall Special here!

If you were a big fan of the London Fog, never fear! London Fogs are available year round on our Secret Menu!

INTRODUCING THE FIG THYME LATTE

We said goodbye to Maple Rosemary and now it’s time for the Fig Thyme Latte! Fans of the Maple Rosemary Latte will enjoy the balance of savory and sweet in our November drink special as the sweet fruitiness of Fig pairs will with the subtle and warm thyme flavor.

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FLAVORS OF FALL

Whether you’re all about the pop-culture phenomenon that is the Pumpkin Spice Latte or you’re looking for a more complex or savory way to celebrate the cooler temperatures, we’re excited to serve our new specials!

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